NAME OF COURSE/MODULE: FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
COURSE CODE: SBP3093
NAME(S) OF ACADEMIC STAFF: ASSOC PROF DR ZAITON HASSAN
RATIONALE FOR THE INCLUSION OF THE COURSE/MODULE IN THE PROGRAMME: This subject aimed to develop an understanding among the students on various microorganisms associated with food products and their beneficial role as well as deleterious effect on processed food products. The topics provide in depth studies on the causative agents of food-borne illnesses, their detection and identification. Understanding their nature and modes of transmission will enhance improvements in food handling procedures and avoid their dissemination into the community.
SEMESTER AND YEAR OFFERED: SEM 1/ YEAR 3
TOTAL STUDENT LEARNING TIME (SLT) FACE TO FACE TOTAL GUIDED AND INDEPENDENT LEARNING
L = Lecture

T = Tutorial

P = Practical

O= Others

L

26

T

 

0

P

 

24

O

 

70.5

L + T + P + O = 120.5 HOURS

CREDIT VALUE: 3
PREREQUISITE (IF ANY): NONE
OBJECTIVES: 1.     To provide an understanding of important characteristics of the various species of food-borne pathogens and food spoilage microbes in the food systems.

2.     To provide students an understanding of general methods for the enumeration, detection and identification of microorganisms in food systems.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

 

Upon successful completion of this course students should have the ability to:

1.     Describe and explain and describe the key term used in food microbiology (C2, A3 – LO1).

2.     Investigate the significance of specific microorganisms in food and food processing environments based on the knowledge of the organisms involved, the product, the processing practices applied, and the processing (C4 – LO1).

3.     Observe, predict, identify, conduct and analyze results of scientific investigations on the microbial activities in foods systems (P2 – LO2, LO3).

4.     Construct and develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to work on a research final year project (P4 – LO2, LO3).

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS: Students should be able to develop problem solving skills through a process of lectures and tutorials.
TEACHING-LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

 

Teaching-learning strategy:

The course will be taught through a combination of formal lectures, assignments, group work, using authentic materials, informal activities and various textbooks.

Assessment strategy:

i.      Formative

ii.     Summative

SYNOPSIS:

 

This course discusses the ecological relationship between microorganisms and food resulting in food spoilage and foodborne illness. Factors affecting microbial growth, the effects of physical factors on the growth of selected pathogens and spoilage, their capacity to survive under stressed conditions, their implications for food preservation and storage, their control and the role of microorganisms in causing foodborne diseases, impacting on food safety will be covered.  The theoretical component of the course is supported by laboratory exercises which focus on analytical skill covering determination of general population and specific microorganisms in food using conventional and modern/rapid methods.
MODE OF DELIVERY: Lecture, lab practical and group work.
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND TYPES:
A. Continuous Assessment (60%)
Category Percentage Assessment Method
Cognitive

Practical skills

  • One Assignment Based on Naqli-Aqli integration microbial quality, safety and health

Communication skills

Team Work and Ethics

30%

20%

 

5%

5%

·         Tests

·         Procedural & Manipulative Skills

·         Lab Reports & Assignment

B. Final Examination (40%)
Examination    40% ·         Structured-type questions.

·         Essay type questions

MAIN REFERENCES SUPPORTING THE COURSE 1.    Bibek, R. (2008). Fundamental Food Microbiology. 4rd Edition.  CRC Press
ADDITIONAL REFERENCES SUPPORTING THE COURSE 1.     Blackburn C.  (2006). Food Spoilage Microorganisms.  CRC Press, Boca Raton.

2.     Jay, J.M. (2005).  Modern Food Microbiology. 7th Edition.  Kluwer Academic Publishers.

3.     Montville, T.J. & Matthews K.R.  (2005). Food Microbiology:  An Introduction.  ASM Press.

4.     Yousef, A.E. & Carlstrom, C. (2003). Food Microbiology: A Laboratory Manual. John Wiley and Sons.

5.     Adams M.R. and M.O. Moss M.O. (2000).  Food Microbiology. 2nd Edition. The Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge.